Conan the Barbarian v1 #8 marvel comic book cover art by Barry Windsor Smith
Barry Windsor Smith
Conan the Barbarian v1 #8, 1971 - Despite the challenge of using four figures, Barry Smith's cover is elegantly balanced. The girl's face appears to have been redrawn by John Romita, who often modified bronze age covers for the sake of consistency. The inside story pages are rife with small panels, but Smith seems to relish detailing them all. His skeletal soldiers are especially eerie, from their waking moments to their disintegration in the light of day (see interior page below). This is number 8 of 20 Conan the Barbarian issues with Smith art and/or covers.
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Smith cover pencils and inks = ***
"The Keepers of the Crypt"
Smith story pencils (Tom Sutton, Tom Palmer inks) 20 pages = ***

Conan the Barbarian v1 #8 marvel comic book page art by Barry Windsor Smith
Barry Windsor Smith
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Blazing Western v1
Timor
1954-54

1 - Steve Ditko art
2-5


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Frank Miller
Dark Horse Presents v1 #61, 1992 - Held captive by the death-dealing prostitutes of Old Town, Marv endures a beating by Goldie's vengeful twin sister. Frank Miller's brutal cover portrait is echoed on his opening panel. As Sin City nears the end of its run, the artwork seems bolder and the layouts more precisely designed. Of the many superb scenes, the array of costumed hookers on page 5 stands out 9see interior page below). Other artists in this issue include David Johnson. This is number 11 of 12 Dark Horse Presents issues with Miller art and/or covers.
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Miller cover pencils and inks = ***
"Sin City episode 12" Miller story pencils and inks 8 pages (black and white) = ****


Frank Miller
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Rampaging Hulk vl #2, 1977 - The original X-men guest-star in this issue, placing the story in the early days of Marvel's continuity. Walt Simonson's pencils are overwhelmed once again by Alfredo Alcala's domineering inks. The highlights include the dynamic opening page of the Hulk careening toward us and the two page spread of the X-men's danger room exercise. With the exception of these two examples, there are few semblances of Simonson's unique style. Interestingly, the X-men are neither shown nor mentioned on the cover. Other artists in this issue include Bob Brown, Rudy Nebres and Ken Barr (cover). This is number 2 of 3 Rampaging Hulk issues with Simonson art and/or covers.
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"And Then The X-men" Simonson story pencils (Alfredo Alcala inks) 33 pages (black & white) = *

Walt Simonson
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Brave and the Bold v1 #18, 1958 - Entering the realm of the Ice King, the Viking Prince faces several deadly obstacles before reaching a sleeping princess. This exceptional work by Joe Kubert showcases his mastery of layout and pacing as much as his superb drawings skills. Each page is designed in relation to the scene or activity. Vertical panels emphasize height and scale (see interior page below). Repetitive panels slow down sequences for dramatic effect. Most impressive of all is Kubert's opening splash of the Viking Prince and the Ice King in battle. He introduces the main characters while arranging the figures in an asymmetrical but perfectly balanced composition. This story was later reprinted in DC Special #5 and Best of DC #26. Other artists in this issue include Russ Heath. This is number 18 of 32 Brave and the Bold issues with Kubert art and/or covers (not including reprints). 
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"Threat of the Ice King" Kubert story pencils and inks 13 pages = *****

Joe Kubert
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Marshall Rogers
Vigilante v1 #41, 1987 - Vastly outnumbered, the Vigilante tries to evade detection on this Marshall Rogers cover. Typically, the hero is the most prominent figure in the layout, often standing out among all visual elements. Here the artist does the opposite, pushing the title character into the darkened background. Regardless, the contrast and central location of the figure make him the focal point. Quite unconventional, but effective just the same. This is number 2 of 2 Vigilante issues with Rogers art and/or covers. Other artists in this issue include Tod Smith and Rick Burchett.
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Rogers cover pencils and inks = ***

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 Carl Barks
Walt Disney's Comics and Stories v1 #148, 1953 - With all his money spent on Christmas, Donald Duck hatches a plan to get a free dinner from his cheapskate Uncle Scrooge. Coinciding with the holidays, this story is not quite as festive as it should be. Carl Barks instead gives us a stubborn battles of wills between Donald and Scrooge. Half the story is set in a restaurant, which provides little opportunity for visual interest. Still, Barks' drawing skills are impressive. The artist later recreated this cover as a painting. It was subsequently used for Christmas Parade v3 #1. Other artists in this issue include Paul Murray.
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Barks cover pencils and inks = ***
Untitled Barks story pencils and inks 10 pages = ***

 Carl Barks
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Red Sonja v1 #8, 1978 - No Nestor Redondo art, despite what some comic book price guides say. The cover and interiors are superbly drawn by Frank Thorne, who made Red Sonja his signature character in the bronze age. Redondo's work does appear in 2 other issues of Red Sonja.

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House of Secrets v1 #8, 1958 - When a wealthy woman dies suddenly, her fortune goes to the care and maintenance of her three cats, much to her conniving butler's dismay. Jack Kirby did some fine work on DC's silver age mystery titles, and this one is no exception. His level of detail is admirable, enhancing the story's opulent settings (see interior page below). This story was later reprinted in Unexpected #127. Other artists in this issue include Bill Ely, Mort Drucker and George Papp. Cover by Ruben Moreira. This is number 3 of 5 House of Secrets issues with Kirby art and/or covers.
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"The Cats Who Knew Too Much" Kirby story pencils and inks 6 pages = ***

Jack Kirby
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Crime Files v1 #5, 1952 - After shooting a cop, two killers find themselves surrounded at every turn. Despite being a single page, this Alex Toth tale is lavishly drawn. Fine screen patterns are applied to backgrounds and shadows. Some areas seem muddy due to the poor reproduction, but overall his efforts are superlative. The effects are similar to his work in Crime and Punishment. Other artists in this issue include George Tuska. This is number 1 of 1 Crime Files issues with Toth art and/or covers.
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"Five State Police Alarm" Toth story pencils and inks 1 page = ****

Alex Toth
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Marvel Premiere v1 #38 featuring Weirdworld, 1977 - Two talented artists come together to produce this fantasy tale, whose elvish characters make their only regular-sized comic book appearance. Mike Ploog provides the wonderfully eerie pencils and Alex Nino inks the pages with a sumptuous textural quality. One of the most notable scenes is when an evil wizard creates minions by spitting out candle wax. It's a humorously magical panel yet beautifully drawn as well. Surprisingly, Ploog and Nino mesh together seamlessly without sacrificing the expression of either artist. Cover by Rudy Nebres. This is number 4 of 4 Marvel Premiere issues with Ploog art and/or covers and number 1 of 1 Marvel Premiere issues with Nino art and/or covers.
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"Weirdworld" Ploog story pencils / Nino inks 18 pages = ****


Mike Ploog / Alex Nino 
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Neal Adams
Batman v1 #224, 1970 - On the roof of a riverboat, a freakish brute prepares to throw the Batman overboard. Devoid of dialogue or banners, Neal Adams' artwork stands powerfully on its own. Note the fine details on the antagonist's clothing and musculature. Other artists in this issue include Irv Novick and Dick Giordano.
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Adams cover pencils (Dick Giordano inks) = ****

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