Gun Glory / Four Color Comics v2 #846, 1957 - Based on the MGM film starring Stewart Granger and Rhonda Fleming, this adaptation begins with movie stills on the inside front cover. Alex Toth's rendition does not capture the actors' likenesses, but is generally faithful to the plot. His quick, concise pen strokes lack more dimension than usual, especially in the faces (see interior page below). This is amply compensated by the richly textured backgrounds throughout the pages. Toth's layout and storytelling skills, as usual, are supreme. This is number 1 of 1 Gun Glory issues with Toth art and/or covers.
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"Gun Glory"
Toth story pencils and inks 32 pages = ***

Gun Glory / Four Color Comics #846 dell western comic book page art by Alex Toth
Alex Toth
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My Past Thrilling Confessions v1 #11, 1950 - Getting married on a lark, Vera finds out her husband is a mean, physically abusive alcoholic. Wally Wood's crude renditions are not uncommon for this time period or this genre. He struggles with the basics, including layout and figure drawing. And yet, his heavy inking style does stand out. In the opening splash, a man towers over his wife from a worm's eye view, suggesting his abusiveness. This is number 1 of 1 My Past Thrilling Confessions issues with Wood art and/or covers.
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"I Was a Slave to Love" Wood story pencils and inks 10 pages = **

Wally Wood
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Legion of Super-Heroes v2 #276, 1981 - Traveling to a medieval-style planet, Legionnaires search for three missing surveyors from the United Planets. Steve Ditko handles the fantasy settings well, given his whimsical style. Some panels could have been more dramatic and more detailed. Still, Ditko's graphic approach stands out, revealing new interpretations of long-standing Legion characters. Inker Frank Chiaramonte does yet another fine job increasing depth and interest. Other artists in this issue include Rich Buckler and Dick Giordano (cover). This is number 5 of 6 Legion of Super-Heroes issues with Ditko art and/or covers.
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"Lord Romdur's Castle" Ditko story pencils (Frank Chiaramonte inks) 25 pages = ***

Legion of Super-Heroes v2 #276 - Steve Ditko dc 1980s comic book page art
Steve Ditko
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Hogan's Heroes v1 #2, 1966 - Steve Ditko's work for Dell Comics was few and far between, but he did manage two issues for this 1960s television-based series. Although his style would seem well suited for it, the artist clearly struggles with the genre. Sal Trapani's inks add some depth and modeling, to the benefit of the pencils, but also tends to suppress Ditko's own unique style. Of the three stories, "Mission Accomplished" is clumsiest in both pacing and layout. Like his Get Smart issues, Ditko strains in his attempt at adapting tv humor. This is number 1 of 2 Hogan's Heroes issues with Ditko art and/or covers.
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"Fire Brigade" Ditko inside front cover pencils (Sal Trapani inks) black and white = **
"Operation Double Klink" Ditko story
pencils (Sal Trapani inks) 10 pages = **
"Klink has Wigged" Ditko story
pencils (Sal Trapani inks) 10 pages = **
"Mission Accomplished" Ditko story
pencils (Sal Trapani inks) 12 pages = **
"Klink's Klinker" Ditko inside back cover
pencils (Sal Trapani inks) black and white = **

Hogan's Heroes v1 #2 - Steve Ditko dell tv 1960s silver age comic book page art
Steve Ditko

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Steve Ditko
Micronauts v1 annual #1, 1979 - Steve Ditko's unapologetically stiff drawings seem oddly appropriate for a series based on the Mego line of action figures. The artist's adherence to a strict nine panel grid on most pages make the annual's length seem even longer. Still, there are a few noteworthy pages. Of the four full page splashes, page 16's summary and page 34's arena scene are both visually strong and memorable. The two page spread on pages 24-25 features an interesting portrait of the characters and various guests, drawn in typical logjam fashion. This is number 1 of 2 Micronauts annual issues with Ditko art and/or covers.
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Ditko cover pencils and inks = **
"Timestream" Ditko story pencils and inks 35 pages including one splash (page 16) and one spread (pages 24, 25) = **


Steve Ditko
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Dynamo v1 #1 tower 1960s silver age comic book cover art by Wally Wood
Wally Wood
Dynamo v1 #1, 1966 - One of the most popular members of T.h.u.n.d.e.r. Agents, the character had this short-lived series during the silver age. In addition to the compelling cover design, Wally Wood illustrates three interior stories. The first appears to be primarily Wood with the aid of assistants and the second is his inks over Reed Crandall's pencils. Both are adequate, with full page opening splashes to compensate for an abundance of panels on subsequent pages. The third, pencilled by Steve Ditko, is slightly better and certainly the most interesting. The opening scene feels more film noir than superhero fiction. This is number 1 of 4 Dynamo issues with Wood art and/or covers and number 1 of 2 Dynamo issues with Ditko art and/or covers.
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Wood cover pencils and inks = ***
"Menace from the Moon" Wood story pencils and inks 14 pages = ***
"Back To The Stone Age" Wood story inks (Reed Crandall
pencils) 10 pages = ***
"Dynamo Meets the Amazing Andor" Ditko story pencils / Wood story inks 10 pages = ***


Dynamo v1 #1 tower 1960s silver age comic book page art by Wally Wood
Wally Wood
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(The Glorious Days of) Robin Hood and his Merry Men v1 #38, 1958 - The Sheriff of Nottingham forces an attractive woman to lure Robin Hood into capture. Steve Ditko tries his hand at a medieval tale featuring a classic heroic figure. The artist's signature style is evident, particularly in the characters' faces, but certain forest scenes lack detail. Other panels are crowded, almost claustrophobic. While adequate, Ditko has shown more effort in other Charlton titles of the same era. This is number 1 of 1 Robin Hood and his Merry Men issues with Ditko art and/or covers.
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"Lure of the Maiden" Ditko story pencils and inks 5 pages = **

Steve Ditko
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Fightin' Army v1 #160, 1982 - Showcasing stories from earlier in the series, this issue boasts a fine Steve Ditko reprint from Fightin' Army #89. Other artists in this issue include Sanho Kim.

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Strange Tales v1 #154 featuring Nick Fury & Doctor Strange, 1967 - A robotic menace breaches the Shield helicarrier, summoned by a Hydra spy within their ranks. Starting with this issue, Jim Steranko fully takes over the art chores on Nick Fury. On the opening splash, the main characters stand against a backdrop of meticulously detailed technology (unfortunately marred by too much text and dialogue). Still, many pages contain the artist's eye-catching experimentations, including repetitive panels, x-ray effects and clever scene transitions. The robot's moment of attack, artfully captured as a full page splash (see interior page below), showcases Steranko's potential. This story was later reprinted in Shield #5. Other artists in this issue include Marie Severin. This is number 4 of 18 Strange Tales issues with Steranko art and/or covers.
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"Beware the Deadly Dreadnought" Steranko story pencils and inks 12 pages = ***

Strange Tales v1 #154 nick fury shield comic book page art by Jim Steranko
Jim Steranko
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Frank Miller
Dark Horse Presents v1 #60, 1992 - Discovering that the city's most powerful man ordered Goldie's murder, Marv contemplates his next move. Frank Miller uses a deluge of rain to cover the central character and the initial setting. His sharpened lines are threatening individually, but as a whole create strangely ethereal images. The technique eventually subsides as his artwork reverts to his usual graphic quality. Still, Miller continues to demonstrate a mastery of high contrast. Other artists in this issue include Rick Geary. This is number 10 of 12 Dark Horse Presents issues with Miller art and/or covers.
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Miller cover pencils and inks = ***
"Sin City episode 11" Miller story pencils and inks 12 pages (black and white) = *****


Frank Miller
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Journey into Mystery v2 #3, 1973 - A Robert Bloch adaptation begins the issue, weakly rendered and composed by Jim Starlin. Far from his usual standards, the layouts are mediocre and the pacing monotonous. Three sequential pages adhere to a rigid twelve panel grid with too few variations in drawings. Even Tom Palmer, one of the finest inkers of the bronze age, could not salvage the pencils. This story was later reprinted in Masters of Terror #1. Other artists in this issue include Sam Kweskin, Ernie Chua, Joe Maneely (reprint) and Gil Kane/Tom Palmer (cover). This is number 3 of 3 Journey into Mystery issues with Starlin art and/or covers.
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"Shambler from the Stars" Starlin story pencils (Tom Palmer inks) 7 pages = *

Jim Starlin
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